Beautiful people dating site cleanses itself of fatties

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“I went home at six and begged my parents to put me on a diet because the kids at school were so mean to me.

I didn’t forget at 37.” Averill currently weighs 230 pounds, swims 75 laps a day, and says her heart is in perfect shape, but doesn’t want Arbour’s—or anyone else’s—seal of approval because of her health status, but because of her humanity.

But if you listen to Arbour’s words and tone, it’s clear that she not only doesn’t know the first thing about fat people’s health—and likely doesn’t know any actual fat people—but that she also is first and foremost concerned with her own comfort level, not other people’s.“So long as people believe that ‘concern trolling’—harassing and threatening people under the guise of being ;concerned for their health;—is acceptable, attitudes like this one will not only exist, but also thrive,” said Melissa A.

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We live in a culture that’s constantly demonizing people who live in fat bodies; believe me, they already know.”Averill has felt the brunt of Arbour’s way of thinking since she was little.

On Saturday, Canadian vlogger and self-described comedian Nicole Arbour was helped in her crusade to shame fat people, when her viral You Tube video “Dear Fat People” was removed from the Google-owned service, along with all her other videos, over the weekend (her channel is now back online, and has racked up over 550,000 views).

The monologue finds Arbour ranting at the camera about how terrible fat people are, saying fat shaming isn’t real (even as she’s in the process of doing it) and that the solution to pretty much every fat person’s life is to lose weight, which is, of course, completely within their control.

The gist of the video, in much more succinct form is: I say “helped,” because by having the video removed, even for a short time period, Arbour can now set herself up as a martyr to political correctness and “censorship,” which she’s already started doing on Twitter.

But the real issue here is why, in 2015, people like Arbour still find it acceptable to proudly post proclaim their visceral disdain for—and, I’d argue, hatred of—an entire group of people.

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